GMVS Summer Workshop 2010

Welcome to our Summer Technology Workshop!



Our Detailed Agenda


 

Friday

(9-11) Edu20 Discussion

  • Wrapping up from last year (copy, archive, and create course templates) Click here for a tutorial…
  • Showcase edu20 exemplars – what’s worked, what has not…
  • Discuss ways we might be able to further utilize edu20.org to increase student learning or help teacher efficiency.

Elements of great project-based lessons:

  • choice when it comes to what the student will learn, at least to some degree, so the student cares about the topic
  • choice when it comes to ways the student will acquire knowledge & skills
  • choice when it comes to ways the student will present their acquired knowledge & skills
  • some worthy real-world or authentic application of student’s acquired knowledge
  • feedback from outside audience (peers, parents, co-teachers, community, etc)
  • clear assessment criteria – the student knows exactly what the goal is and how they will be graded – the student should own the assessment tool and perhaps have helped to develop it

(11-2) Cool Tool Exploration (break for lunch from 12-12:30)

 

(2-4) Lab Time – optional

 

Wednesday:

(9-10:30) Diigo (see how-to’s in the right column)

- Group Assignments

  1. Set up a tagging methodology for GMVS teachers and students.
  2.  Find at least one AMAZING class resource using Delicious or Diigo and write a review on edu20 (assignment #4)
  3. Create a lesson that can be used to teach students about Diigo and Delicious.

(10:30-12:00) Web-Based Video (see how-to’s in the right column)

(12:00-12:30) Lunch

(12:30-1:30) Screencasts

(1:30-2:00) Edu20 Updates (archives)

(2-4) Lab Time – optional

www.freireproject.org/blogs/creativity-crisis-po-bronson-nurture-shock-and-ashey-marryman

 

Monday:

(9-9:15) Create Game-Plan (done together as a whole group)

- What are our goals?

- We will explore 5 tools or skills this week – which should we focus on?

- How will we structure the week?

- The GMVS pre-workshop survey data will serve as a springboard for this discussion.

(9:15-11:00) 1st Year Reflection (done online in our edu20 class – assignment #1)

- What have been the pros and cons of school-wide use of edu20? (school-wide level)

- In what ways has edu20 both helped or hindered your practice? (personal level)

- What are some of the best lessons/activities/assignments that have been done this past year?  What are some of the flops?

(11:00-12:30) What’s Next? (done online in our edu20 class and in-class)

- Take a look at New & Upcoming features of edu20.org – Cruise the support forums and find a new feature to share! (assignment #2)

- Identify features we would like to see added – add your suggestions using the google form on the right of this page —–>

- Trends in public school education -> What are 21st Century Skills and do we have an obligation to teach them?  (assignment #3)

 

20th Century Classroom vs. the 21st Century Classroom

USA 1960’s typical classroom – teacher-centered, fragmented curriculum, students working in isolation, memorizing facts.

A classroom at the School of Environmental Studies, aka the Zoo School, in Minneapolis.  A perfect example of real-life, relevant, project-based 21st century education.

 

Time-based

Outcome-based

 

Focus:  memorization of discrete facts

Focus:  what students Know, Can Do and Are Like after all the details are forgotten.

 

Lessons focus on the lower level of Bloom’s Taxonomy – knowledge, comprehension and application.

Learning is designed on upper levels of Blooms’ – synthesis, analysis and evaluation (and include lower levels as curriculum is designed down from the top.)

 

Textbook-driven

Research-driven

 

Passive learning

Active Learning

 

Learners work in isolation – classroom within 4 walls

Learners work collaboratively with classmates and others around the world – the Global Classroom

 

Teacher-centered:  teacher is center of attention and provider of information

 

Student-centered:  teacher is facilitator/coach

Little to no student freedom

Great deal of student freedom

 

“Discipline problems – educators do not trust students and vice versa.  No student motivation.

No “discipline problems” – students and teaches have mutually respectful relationship as co-learners; students are highly motivated.

 

Fragmented curriculum

Integrated and Interdisciplinary curriculum

 

Grades averaged

Grades based on what was learned

 

Low expectations

High expectations – “If it isn’t good it isn’t done.”  We expect, and ensure, that all students succeed in learning at high levels.  Some may go higher – we get out of their way to let them do that.

 

Teacher is judge.  No one else sees student work.

Self, Peer and Other assessments.  Public audience, authentic assessments.

 

Curriculum/School is irrelevant and meaningless to the students.

Curriculum is connected to students’ interests, experiences, talents and the real world.

 

Print is the primary vehicle of learning and assessment.

Performances, projects and multiple forms of media are used for learning and assessment

 

Diversity in students is ignored.

Curriculum and instruction address student diversity

 

Literacy is the 3 R’s – reading, writing and math

Multiple literacies of the 21st century – aligned to living and working in a globalized new millennium.

 

Factory model, based upon the needs of employers for the Industrial Age of the 19th century.  Scientific management.

 

Global model, based upon the needs of a globalized, high-tech society.
Driven by the NCLB and standardized testing mania.

 

Standardized testing has its place.  Education is not driven by the NCLB and standardized testing mania.

Chart above borrowed from: www.21stcenturyschools.com/What_is_21st_Century_Education.htm

 

A more comical ‘Did You Know’ video

(12:30-1:00) Lunch

(1:00-2:00) Cool Tool #1 – Delicious

- Group Assignments

  1. Set up a tagging methodology for GMVS teachers and students.
  2.  Find at least one AMAZING class resource using Delicious or Diigo and write a review on edu20 (assignment #4)
  3. Create a lesson that can be used to teach students about Diigo and Delicious.

 

 

 

(2:00-4:00) Lab Time – optional

 

 

Leave a Reply


6 − three =